A visit to Landews Meadow Farm in Kent

It is always good to visit other farms to learn, as my hero Joel Salatin puts it, you can always learn something from a visit to another farm. Last week Richard and I visited the lovely Nigel and Wendy Griffith at their farm in Kent, Landews Meadow Farm.

Nigel and Wendy Griffith of Landews Meadow Farm.

Nigel and Wendy Griffith of Landews Meadow Farm.

One of our main motivations for visiting was to learn about their work with the methods of Dr Elaine Ingham to make and use compost to improve soil biology. You can read about what we learned about this here on our sister site dedicated to our discoveries about Elaine Ingham’s methods, Green Mantle.

But there is far more to Landews Meadows Farm than the compost heaps, so it would be remiss of me not to share something else of what we learned! This is just a few edited highlights that are particularly relevant to The Oak Tree, do visit their comprehensive web page to find out more

The Landews Meadow Farm pigs enjoy a woodland home, with just a single electric fence wire to keep them in!

The Landews Meadow Farm pigs enjoy a woodland home, with just a single electric fence wire to keep them in!

The Landews Meadow Farm hens enjoy high tech barley that has bee sprouted to increase protein and nutrient content in the low energy, high tech unit made in China - impressive!

The Landews Meadow Farm hens enjoy barley that has been sprouted to increase protein and nutrient content in this low energy, high tech unit made in China – impressive!

The Landews Meadow Farm meat chicken processing unit - a small but perfectly formed container divided into two sections for plucking and gutting.

The Landews Meadow Farm meat chicken processing unit – a small but perfectly formed container divided into two sections for plucking and gutting.

The Landews Meadow Farm cattle are mob grazed to improve the soil, moved regularly onto fairly small areas to mimic the movement of a natural herd of ruminants.

The Landews Meadow Farm cattle are mob grazed to improve the soil, moved regularly onto fairly small areas to mimic the movement of a natural herd of ruminants.

Happy, healthy chickens that follow a few days after the cows a la Polyface Farm

Happy, healthy chickens that follow a few days after the cows a la Polyface Farm

This trough from Kiwitech looks intriguing! Could it work for our pigs? Carrying their water at The Oak Tree is a chore...

This trough from Kiwitech looks intriguing! Could it work for our pigs? Carrying their water at The Oak Tree is a chore…

Once again, Joanne has tractor envy.

Once again, Joanne has tractor envy.

A huge thank you to Nigel and Wendy for welcoming us to their beautiful, innovative and productive farm!

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